Migration Update for 02 October 2014

Another fine night of nocturnal flight.

Weather conditions were ideal with a bit of a tail wind out of the NW, clear skies, and an urge to push south.  Birds are on the move.

Watch the tail end of the radar loop below closely (Click on the gallery to bring up a screen size image).  As the migrants thin out, but not quite put down, a small bright green flash appears along the Willamette River between Yamhill and Marion counties — Swallows.

Migration Update 01 Oct 2014

It’s been a busy month for the migrants.  A huge push of Greater White-fronted Geese last week. Cacklers are back in force and duck numbers are building, some even showing basic plumage. Shorebirds have probably peeked but are still on the move.  Winter sparrows are in as are the Kinglets.  Migrant summer resident breeders have moved out for the most part.  Fall

Last night the high pressure system spinning up off shore drove northerly wind on a relatively clear night and the birds took advantage.

Migration Update 16 Sept 2014

A fairly decent night of migration in the face of light crosswinds out of the east and upper level southerly flow.  The bloom sticks mainly to the east side of the I5 corridor.

The .gif file below shows the dBZ reaching the 25 – 30 range indicating heavy, if not widespread, migration last night.

RTX Base Velocity 16 Sept 2014

RTX Base Velocity 16 Sept 2014

On the Barn Swallow front; examining the past static images, and the one enclosed today, it appears there is actually three roosts taking off just after dawn. In today’s image i have highlighted the clusters just as they begin to rise and prior to dispersal.

Barn Swallow Morning Fly-out.

Barn Swallow Morning Fly-out.

Migration Update 15 Sept 2014

Really not much happening on the broader migration front.  Of note is that the Sandhill Cranes are back in good numbers out on Sauvie Island.

Today i have put together a quilt of images showing the Swallow morning fly-out on the Yamhill/Marion County border.  I can’t slow the .gif files down and this goes by pretty fast.  It takes about 45 minutes in total but that is covered in only 5 or 6 frames.  You can always go to the COD weather website and control the image speed, but here it is in single frames stiched together.  (i think my time marking may be off by 10 minutes or so)

Click on the thumbnail to bring up a larger image:

Barn Swallow Morning Fly-out.

Barn Swallow Morning Fly-out.

2014 Fall Migration Update

Well, it had to happen some time.  The blog is running out of free disk space.  So, posting from now on will be sparse and limited to a few Choice snapshots of each season.

Like last night and this morning.  Excellent migrant bloom sustained throughout the night, with tracks up into the Puget trough.  And — as a bonus — at 13:30 UTC (06:30 PDT) for four frames there can be seen the morning exodus of the swallow roost on the border of Yamhill and Marion Counties.  It last for about four to six frames and the density is impressive.  (Click on the thumbnail below to bring up a larger animated .gif file)

20140910_BV-RTX

30 May 2014 PNW Migration Update

This is the last update for the season.  With a bit of luck i’ll be back in the fall.

And we close with a stream of feathers in the sky.

Pacific Northwest Radar: (Click on the links below to open the .gif files in a new window)

30 May Base Reflectivity - Portland (KRTX)

30 May Base Reflectivity – Gray’s Harbor (KLGX)

30 May Base Reflectivity - Seattle (KATX)

Here is the grand view of the winds aloft from Earth:

30 May Earth: WPD at 850 mb

Here is Paul’s archived National Radar Composite from yesterday. Look at the wind map, and then the radar.

And here are the weather maps (click on any image to bring up a full gallery view)

29 May 2014 PNW Migration Update

Some rather unstable weather, WNW winds, it’s late in the season …. and still there is a sea of feathers overhead.  Well, maybe just a puddle, but impressive none the less.

As the high pressure ridge builds in behind our recent low we can expect the winds to shift to a more northerly component, but the skies should clear.  So it will depend on the strength of the winds tomorrow night to determine the magnitude of the last covered flight of the season.  I’m hoping the winds are light and the sky is filled with the remnants of the feathered travelers.  The past few nights i have regularly heard the nocturnal flight calls of Swainson’s Thrush – it’s comforting, and brings a bit of joy to my world.

Before we take a look at the loops: “Message Date: May 28 2014 15:26:44 KRTX MAY HAVE PERIODIC DATA LOSS TODAY FROM 28/16Z THROUGH 29/02Z DUE TO AN AWIP S UPGRADE AT WFO PORTLAND.”

I have no idea what that means and i don’t really see any problems in the loop, but some more discerning eye might so, there you have it.

29 May Base Reflectivity - Portland (KRTX)

29 May Base Reflectivity – Gray’s Harbor (KLGX)

29 May Base Reflectivity - Seattle (KATX)

Here is the grand view of the winds aloft from Earth:

29 May Earth: WPD at 850 mb

Here is Paul’s archived National Radar Composite from yesterday. Look at the wind map, and then the radar.

And here are the weather maps (click on any image to bring up a full gallery view)

28 May 2014 PNW Migration Update

Less than ideal conditions, but nothing extreme.  A light westerly wind and a few rain cells to dodge – that’s about it.  So the laggards continue to lay a line north.  Densities are dropping as we are on the last legs of the journey.

Pacific Northwest Radar: (Click on the links below to open the .gif files in a new window)

28 May Base Reflectivity - Portland (KRTX)

28 May Base Reflectivity – Gray’s Harbor (KLGX)

28 May Base Reflectivity - Seattle (KATX)

Here is the grand view of the winds aloft from Earth:

28 May Earth: WPD at 850 mb

Here is Paul’s archived National Radar Composite from yesterday. Look at the wind map, and then the radar.

And here are the weather maps (click on any image to bring up a full gallery view)

27 May 2014 PNW Migration Update

Winds are light and out of the west — no big deal.  Migrants continue to flow north and are now looking to fill in the remaining nesting sites.  “FOS” is a term of the past on the listserves.  In eastern Oregon a number of expected vagrants are taking up bandwidth as birders flock to Malheur NWR as surely as Buffleheads fly to Manitoba.

This will be the last week for updates this season — unless something mega turns up in the region.

Pacific Northwest Radar: (Click on the links below to open the .gif files in a new window)

27 May Base Reflectivity - Portland (KRTX)

27 May Base Reflectivity – Gray’s Harbor (KLGX)

27 May Base Reflectivity - Seattle (KATX)

Here is the grand view of the winds aloft from Earth:

27 May Earth: WPD at 850 mb

Here is Paul’s archived National Radar Composite from yesterday. Look at the wind map, and then the radar.

And here are the weather maps (click on any image to bring up a full gallery view)

22 May 2014 PNW Migration Update

Migration in the region last night was a bit reduced from yesterday.  It could be the north winds were slightly stronger and it could be we are running out of birds.  Probably a little of both.  You can see the intensity dropping across the country.  With a second report of Nighthawks it’s pretty much what you would expect.

Next migration update is planned for Tuesday 27 May. I’m taking off for a long weekend.

Pacific Northwest Radar: (Click on the links below to open the .gif files in a new window)

22 May Base Reflectivity - Portland (KRTX)

22 May Base Reflectivity – Gray’s Harbor (KLGX)

22 May Base Reflectivity - Seattle (KATX)

Here is the grand view of the winds aloft from Earth:

22 May Earth: WPD at 850 mb

Here is Paul’s archived National Radar Composite from yesterday. Look at the wind map, and then the radar.

And here are the weather maps (click on any image to bring up a full gallery view)