22 September 2015 – PNW Migration Update

Welcome to Fall.

Birds were jamming last night!  Decent conditions, light northerly winds on a clear night across the Pacific Northwest.

The grand passage of the Greater White-fronted Geese yesterday – wow!  Probably a once in a lifetime experience. From the Portland Basin to the Southern Coast reports came in of GWFG in the thousands passing overhead.  A remarkable event.

Anyway i added the Seattle radar loop today because it was packed with birds and i don’t think i’ve posted one from there this season.  So here it is, your moment of zen:

Oh, look at the RTX loop and see if you can spot the Barn Swallows going to roost,  Starts around 00:00 UTC.

 

21 September 2015 – PNW Migration Update

I just got back from a walk around the block, specifically to listen for migrating Greater White-fronted Geese.  They were streaming overhead, flock after flock, non-stop.

Which brings us to today’s radar loops.  The RTX loop is very interesting.  Shortly after sunset there was a small but noticeable flight out of the area for about an hour or so, and then — nothing of note.  That is until around 2:30 AM (PDST) and BOOM!  The sky is just filled with returns up to the 30 dBZ level.  I suspect a majority being Greater White-fronted Geese.

I also threw in the Gray’s Harbor (LGX) loop because this is the largest sustained flight i’ve seen this season from there.

Note the wind map and the favorable winds out of the NNW.

 

10 September 2015 – PNW Migration Update

 

Another solid night of migration.  This high pressure ridge just wants to stick around.  That brings gentle winds out of the north and makes excellent conditions for southbound migrants.

Greater White-fronted Geese, Sandhill Cranes, and more winter sparrows are all being reported in the area.  It’s a good time to get out into the field.

Here it is, your moment of zen:

 

02 September 2015 – PNW Migration Update

The radar was obscured by the weather last night.  We could make out very low level movement between the cells but nothing to write about.  I did hear a number of Swainson’s Thrush nocturnal flight calls the past couple of nights.

Up north in BC at the Tatlayoko banding station the first Fox and Golden-crowned Sparrows were banded and a flock of Greater White-fronted Geese were seen.

As David LaPuma would say, “look busy … birds are coming!”